Category: iPhone

Should you preorder Apple’s iPhone 8, or wait for the iPhone X?

By Roger Fingas Wednesday, September 13, 2017, 01:06 pm PT (04:06 pm ET) With pre-orders starting this Friday, and the first deliveries hitting Sept. 22, it may be tempting to buy an iPhone 8 instead of waiting for the iPhone X, coming Nov. 3. There are a few factors to consider before going either route. Cost, naturally, will be the overarching concern for most people. At $699 — $50 more than the iPhone 7 was a week ago — even a 64-gigabyte iPhone 8 may be too expensive. The $999 price tag on the iPhone X could be a non-starter unless your phone is your primary computing device, or you're simply affluent enough that it doesn't matter. When you consider that you could buy a MacBook Air or a complete Windows PC for the same amount, that should give pause. Either device may be more affordable under Apple's iPhone Upgrade Program, which guarantees a new iPhone and AppleCare+ every year in exchange for monthly payments and trading in your old iPhone. Remember though that in Read the full article →

Now’s a good time to check which of your apps won’t open in iOS 11 as 32-bit support dropped

  Apple was dropping support for 32-bit applications altogether in iOS 11. In iOS 10, Apple displays a warning message and then allows the app to open; in iOS 11, the app won’t open at all. But with some 187,000 32-bit apps still in the App Store – amounting to around 8% of the total – now would be a good time to check your own apps. It takes just a few seconds to do this … The estimate of the total number of 32-bit apps still out there comes from Oliver Yeh, co-founder of app intelligence firm Sensor Tower, via Business Insider. To check whether you currently have any 32-bit apps installed, go to Settings > General > About > Applications. If nothing happens when you tap Applications, you’re good. But if you have any 32-bit apps, they will be shown on the next screen. It makes sense to check before upgrading to iOS 11, so that you have time to find replacements apps. Apple is taking the stricter approach in iOS 11 because supporting 32-bit apps degrades Read the full article →

MacDaddy Security News: Australian Mac and iOS users find devices remotely locked, held for ransom (and how to keep yours safe)

The Sydney Morning Herald reports that several Australian Mac, iPhone, and iPad users are finding that their devices have been locked remotely through Apple’s Find My iPhone service by someone using the name “Oleg Pliss.” The hacker (or hackers) then demand payments of around $50 to $100 to an anonymous PayPal account in order to restore the devices to their owners. An active thread on Apple’s support forum was started yesterday as users started to discover that they had been targeted by the attack. According to that discussion, users are finding all of their devices locked at once rather than a single device per user. Based on that report and the fact that Find My iPhone is being used to hold the devices hostage, it seems likely that the perpetrator has gained access to these users’ iCloud accounts—possibly through password reuse by those users—rather than some device-specific malware or hack.     Because the hackers used Find My iPhone Read the full article →

iOS: How to restore your content

Learn how to restore the content on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch using iCloud or iTunes. iCloud and iTunes can back up most data on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. Backed-up information includes purchased music, TV shows, apps, and books*; photos and video in the Camera Roll; device settings (for example, Phone Favorites, Wallpaper, and Mail, Contacts, Calendar accounts); app data; Home screen and app organization; Messages (iMessage, SMS, and MMS), ringtones, and more. Media files synced from your computer aren’t backed up, but can be restored by syncing with iTunes. * Backup of purchased music is not available in all countries. Backup of purchased TV shows occurs only in the United States. Previous purchases may not be restored if they are no longer in the iTunes Store, App Store, or iBooks Store. iCloud How to restore from a backup To learn more about what is backed up, see the iCloud: Backup and Restore Overview article. When you go through Setup Read the full article →

iOS: How to back up your content

Learn how to back up the content on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch using iCloud or iTunes. iCloud and iTunes can back up most data on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. Backed-up information includes purchased music, TV shows, apps, and books*; photos and video in the Camera Roll; device settings (for example, Phone Favorites, Wallpaper, and Mail, Contacts, Calendar accounts); app data; Home screen and app organization; Messages (iMessage, SMS, and MMS), ringtones, and more. Media files synced from your computer aren’t backed up, but can be restored by syncing with iTunes. * Backup of purchased music is not available in all countries. Backup of purchased TV shows occurs only in the United States. Previous purchases may not be restored if they are no longer in the iTunes Store, App Store, or iBooks Store.   iCloud How to back up iCloud automatically backs up the most important data on your device using iOS 5 or later. After you have enabled Backup on your iPhone, Read the full article →

iTunes: Restoring iOS software

Learn how to use iTunes to restore your iOS device.  Try restoring the iOS device if backing up and erasing all content and settings doesn't resolve the issue. Restoring your device will delete all data and content, including songs, videos, contacts, photos, and calendar information, and will restore all settings to their factory condition. Before restoring: Verify that you are using the latest version of iTunes. Back up your device. Transfer and sync content to your computer. Restoring your iOS device Connect your device to your computer. Select your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch when it appears in iTunes. Select the Summary tab, and click the Restore button. Click Restore. iTunes may prompt you with a software license agreement. If you click Agree, iTunes will download the iOS software file (.ipsw file) before restoring. After a restore, the iOS device restarts. You should then see "Slide to set up". Follow the steps in the iOS Setup Assistant. If Read the full article →

Back up your iPod touch, iPhone, or iPad

When you connect your iPod touch, iPhone, or iPad to your computer, certain files and settings on your device are automatically backed up to your computer. You can restore this information to your device if you need to (if you get a new iPhone, for example, and want to transfer your previous settings to it). Automatically backed-up information includes text messages, notes, call history, contact favorites, sound settings, widget settings, and more. In addition, photos in Camera Roll or Saved Photos are also backed up. Other media files (such as songs, videos, and some photos) aren’t backed up, but can be restored by syncing with iTunes. If you have iOS 3.0 or later and Mac OS X 10.5.7 or later, iTunes can also encrypt your backups to secure your data. HideBack up or restore your device Connect your iPod touch, iPhone, or iPad to the computer you normally sync with and select your device. Click Summary. Do one of the following: Back up or restore from a backup Read the full article →

iCloud: Restore your iOS device from iCloud

When you set up a new iOS device or need to restore information on one you already have, your iCloud backup makes it easy. Restore from an iCloud backup On your iOS device, go to Settings > General > Software Update. If a newer version of iOS is available, follow the onscreen instructions to download and install it. You must update your device to the latest version of iOS to make sure you can restore from a recent backup of another device, such as a lost or broken device. Make sure you have a recent backup to restore from. Go to Settings > iCloud > Storage & Backup, then look at the bottom of the screen for the message Last Backup, followed by the date of the latest backup. For information about backing up manually now, see Back up your iOS device to iCloud. If you don’t see a backup you expected to be there, see the Apple Support article iCloud: Troubleshooting restoring an iCloud backup. Go to Settings > General > Reset, then tap Read the full article →

How to Reset Your iPad

How to Reset the iPad to Factory Default By Daniel Nations The two most common reasons for resetting an iPad to the factory default settings are to prepare the iPad up for a new owner or to overcome a problem with the iPad that simply rebooting the iPad won't solve. If you are planning on selling your iPad, or even giving it to a family member, you will want to reset the iPad to the factory default settings. This will wipe your iPad, erasing the settings and data, and returning it to the exact state as when you first opened the box. By wiping the iPad, you allow it to be set up properly by the new owner. You also protect yourself and your personal information by making sure all of the settings and data are erased from the iPad. Resetting the iPad is also used as a troubleshooting tool. Many common problems can be solved by deleting the offending app and downloading it again from the App Store or powering the iPad down and restarting it, but problems that persist beyond Read the full article →